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Why did Kawasaki supercharge?

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  • Why did Kawasaki supercharge?

    This is a fascinating read on current high performance moto engines and what drove Kawi's recent tech choices:

    https://www.motorcycle.com/features/...ure-holds.html

  • #2
    Yeah, I figured it was due to Euro emissions standards.

    It is truly amazing what kind of power they can make with superchargers and turbos these days.

    My wife's little 3.0 V6 has dual turbos and makes 405 HP

    I'm all about superchargers and turbos for emission standards.

    I'm so concerned, I think they need to put a supercharger on the 14 R
    I have neither the time,or the inclination, to explain myself to a man, who rises and sleep under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner, in which I provide it. I'd rather you just say 'thank you' and go on your way.

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    • #3
      My only concern with turbo and supercharged technology is long term maintenance costs. I owned a number of turbo charged cars years ago and the turbos were the weak link and repairs weren’t cheap. It’s all fine when everything is on warranty. My concern is will we be able to afford to keep today’s modern vehicles running when the warranty is up and the mileage starts to accrue or will the mechanical costs of maintaining them become prohibitive. There are many people experiencing mechanical costs that are exceeding the value of the vehicle with older high end models these days. I’m not one to buy a new vehicle every 4 or 5 years just to stay in warranty.
      Last edited by NotDeadYet; 03-07-2021, 12:32 PM.


      "I tried being reasonable, I didn't like it!"

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      • #4
        No blowers for me on my daily driver. On a skoot, oh yes.
        If I had the money to have a "play car" with one, oh yes, again.
        Daily driver, been there, done that.
        "If it ain't broke, don't fix it...
        but sometimes it just needs a mod"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by NotDeadYet View Post
          My only concern with turbo and supercharged technology is long term maintenance costs. I owned a number of turbo charged cars years ago and the turbos were the weak link and repairs weren’t cheap. It’s all fine when everything is on warranty. My concern is will we be able to afford to keep today’s modern vehicles running when the warranty is up and the mileage starts to accrue or will the mechanical costs of maintaining them become prohibitive. There are many people experiencing mechanical costs that are exceeding the value of the vehicle with older high end models these days. I’m not one to buy a new vehicle every 4 or 5 years just stay in warranty.
          Your concerns are valid: it's going to cost me a fortune to maintain compared to my Zed, and I sometimes wonder if I shouldn't have bought a BMW boxer twin instead to save money

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CHARLIE View Post
            No blowers for me on my daily driver. On a skoot, oh yes.
            If I had the money to have a "play car" with one, oh yes, again.
            Daily driver, been there, done that.
            They've gotten better over time - you don't need turbo timers anymore to prevent disposable cokey turbos but some of the twin turbo motors are so needlessly complex (ahem Ford) that you'd be nuts to keep one out of warranty. The worst is the latest generation of supercharged AND turbocharged motors: what are they thinking with all that plumbing

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            • #7
              Yes, they are a pain IF you have to work on them, but they are far, far more trouble free than in the '80s and '90s. And even back then, you could avoid most trouble by using the right oil and following simple cool-down procedure.

              I don't presently have any forced-induction vehicles, but if the one I wanted had a blower, I wouldn't hesitate.
              How To Cheat on Personality Tests
              1. When asked for word associations or comments about the world, give the most conventional, run-of-the-mill, pedestrian answer possible.

              2. To settle on the most beneficial answer to any question, repeat to yourself:
              (a) I loved my father and my mother, but my father a little bit more.
              (b) I like things pretty well the way they are.
              (c) I never worry much about anything.
              (d) I don't care for books or music much.
              (e) I love my wife and children.
              (f) I don't let them get in the way of company work.
              From <cite>The Organization Man</cite> by William Hollingsworth Whyte, 1956

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