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Riding on the street - The Pace

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  • #46
    Re: Riding on the street - The Pace

    Awesome !!! It's too easy to let our egos get out of control - this puts it in perspective - the reason I ride is for the feeling of freedom it gives me since I was 16 yrs old on my Yamaha 305 (that's almost 48 yrs of riding) and I want to keep riding as long as I can. Thanks for the words.

    Comment


    • #47
      Re: Riding on the street - The Pace

      Originally posted by gregness View Post
      In case you may not have noticed, Nick I. has updated "The Pace" in "The Pace 2.0", in last month's Cycle World. (Somehow he never mentions that he wrote that at "Motorcyclist") The biggest update had to do with brakes- using them to help turn the bike, and transitioning from them as you turn in. Worth a look.

      I am one of those who was taught, back in the Dark Ages, that all the rear brake can do for you at speed is get you in trouble. I have never touched it when riding hard. I have read much lately about how key it can be to getting a bike turned, and I guess I should start experiementing with it. (Old Dog here, new tricks sound scary)

      G
      Just read this, interesting but maybe it would be better if he completely re-wrote it.

      The use of the rear brake is somewhere where he completely parts company with Keith Code. In his book, the advice is not to use the rear when braking hard. Maybe on the track it's good advice for beginners, but I've always used the rear after being taught to do so at riding school 40 years ago.

      My feeling is that using the rear as you start to brake stabilises the bike and slows down the initial weight transfer to the front. Once you're hard on the front, the rear won't be doing much anyway and you ease it off. Unless your name is Marc Marquez and you want to back the bike into the corner...
      "You don't get slower with age, you just get more cautious." Michael Rutter

      06 Ocean Blue ZZR1200, the coolest colour.
      99 Yamaha R1

      Comment


      • #48
        Re: Riding on the street - The Pace

        Here's a link to the article.


        http://www.cycleworld.com/2013/09/16...riding-skills/

        The-Pace-2-Illustration.jpg

        Comment


        • #49
          Re: Riding on the street - The Pace

          Originally posted by Moise View Post
          Originally posted by gregness View Post
          In case you may not have noticed, Nick I. has updated "The Pace" in "The Pace 2.0", in last month's Cycle World. (Somehow he never mentions that he wrote that at "Motorcyclist") The biggest update had to do with brakes- using them to help turn the bike, and transitioning from them as you turn in. Worth a look.

          I am one of those who was taught, back in the Dark Ages, that all the rear brake can do for you at speed is get you in trouble. I have never touched it when riding hard. I have read much lately about how key it can be to getting a bike turned, and I guess I should start experiementing with it. (Old Dog here, new tricks sound scary)

          G
          Just read this, interesting but maybe it would be better if he completely re-wrote it.

          The use of the rear brake is somewhere where he completely parts company with Keith Code. In his book, the advice is not to use the rear when braking hard. Maybe on the track it's good advice for beginners, but I've always used the rear after being taught to do so at riding school 40 years ago.

          My feeling is that using the rear as you start to brake stabilises the bike and slows down the initial weight transfer to the front. Once you're hard on the front, the rear won't be doing much anyway and you ease it off. Unless your name is Marc Marquez and you want to back the bike into the corner...




          If you have to use your rear brake to settle the bike before a turn on the street you are RIDING OVER YOUR HEAD AND TO FAST FOR THE STREET. peace

          Comment


          • #50
            Re: Riding on the street - The Pace

            Originally posted by ZZ-r View Post
            Originally posted by Moise View Post
            Originally posted by gregness View Post
            In case you may not have noticed, Nick I. has updated "The Pace" in "The Pace 2.0", in last month's Cycle World. (Somehow he never mentions that he wrote that at "Motorcyclist") The biggest update had to do with brakes- using them to help turn the bike, and transitioning from them as you turn in. Worth a look.

            I am one of those who was taught, back in the Dark Ages, that all the rear brake can do for you at speed is get you in trouble. I have never touched it when riding hard. I have read much lately about how key it can be to getting a bike turned, and I guess I should start experiementing with it. (Old Dog here, new tricks sound scary)

            G
            Just read this, interesting but maybe it would be better if he completely re-wrote it.

            The use of the rear brake is somewhere where he completely parts company with Keith Code. In his book, the advice is not to use the rear when braking hard. Maybe on the track it's good advice for beginners, but I've always used the rear after being taught to do so at riding school 40 years ago.

            My feeling is that using the rear as you start to brake stabilises the bike and slows down the initial weight transfer to the front. Once you're hard on the front, the rear won't be doing much anyway and you ease it off. Unless your name is Marc Marquez and you want to back the bike into the corner...




            If you have to use your rear brake to settle the bike before a turn on the street you are RIDING OVER YOUR HEAD AND TO FAST FOR THE STREET. peace
            I don't have to use the rear, it just feels more stable. I always use the rear when it's wet to make up for the loss of grip from the front tyre.

            As I said, I was taught to use the rear 40 years ago. And you kind of had to anyway, as no bikes on the road then had twin front disc brakes with low profile radials. In fact, most bikes had drum brakes on the front which had to be carefully adjusted to get the double leading shoes to bite evenly.

            But today it seems like quite a few riders never use their rear brake.
            "You don't get slower with age, you just get more cautious." Michael Rutter

            06 Ocean Blue ZZR1200, the coolest colour.
            99 Yamaha R1

            Comment


            • #51
              Re: Riding on the street - The Pace

              Great article, Ive seen this years ago.. I see many younger riders competing out on the streets
              2006 ZX 14 Blue

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by CrazyTrain View Post
                I try and incorporate much of the following article in my riding as my wonting ability permits. Posted for the benefit of all in the ZZR community. Even if it's not for you, hopefully it will get many of us to think about how we enjoy our bikes with our friends.

                *****

                THE PACE
                BY NICK IENATSCH

                .... Racing involves speed, concentration and commitment; the results of a mistake are usually catastrophic because there's little room for error riding at 100 percent. Performance street riding is less intense and further from the absolute limit, but because circumstances are less controlled, mistakes and over aggressiveness can be equally catastrophic. Plenty of roadracers have sworn off street riding. "Too dangerous, too many variables and too easy to get carried away with too much speed," track specialists claim. Adrenaline-addled racers find themselves treating the street like the track, and not surprisingly, they get burned by the police, the laws of physics and the cold, harsh realities of an environment not groomed for ten-tenths riding.


                .... But as many of us know, a swift ride down a favorite road may be the finest way to spend a few free hours with a bike we love. And these few hours are best enjoyed riding at The Pace.

                .... A year after I joined Motorcyclist staff in 1984, Mitch Boehm was hired. Six months later, The Pace came into being, and we perfected it during the next few months of road testing and weekend fun rides. Now The Pace is part of my life - and a part of the Sunday morning riding group I frequent. The Pace is a street riding technique that not only keeps street riders alive, but thoroughly entertained as well.

                THE PACE

                .... The Pace focuses on bike control and de-emphasizes outright speed. Full-throttle acceleration and last minute braking aren't part of the program, effectively eliminating the two most common single-bike accident scenarios in sport riding. Cornering momentum is the name of the game, stressing strong, forceful inputs at the handlebar to place the bike correctly at the entrance of the turn and get it flicked in with little wasted time and distance. Since the throttle wasn't slammed open at the exit of the last corner, the next corner doesn't require much, if any, braking. It isn't uncommon to ride with our group and not see a brake light flash all morning.

                .... If the brakes are required, the front lever gets squeezed smoothly, quickly and with a good deal of force to set entrance speed in minimum time. Running in on the brakes is tantamount to running off the road, a confession that you're pushing too hard and not getting your entrance speed set early enough because you stayed on the gas too long. Running The Pace decreases your reliance on the throttle and brakes, the two easiest controls to abuse, and hones your ability to judge cornering speed, which is the most thrilling aspect of performance street riding.

                YOUR LANE IS YOUR LIMIT

                .... Crossing the centerline at any time except during a passing maneuver is intolerable, another sign that you're pushing too hard to keep up. Even when you have a clean line of sight through a left-hand kink, stay to the right of the centerline. Staying on the right side of the centerline is much more challenging than simply straightening every slight corner, and when the whole group is committed to this intelligent practice, the temptation to cheat is eliminated through peer pressure and logic. Though street riding shouldn't be described in racing terms, you can think of your lane as the race track. Leaving your lane is tantamount to a crash.

                .... Exact bike control has you using every inch of your lane if the circumstances permit it. In corners with a clear line of sight and no oncoming traffic, enter at the far outside of the corner, turn the bike relatively late in the corner to get a late apex at the far inside of your lane and accelerate out, just brushing the far outside of your lane as your bike stands up. Steer your bike forcefully but smoothly to minimize the transition time. Don't hammer it down because the chassis will bobble slightly as it settles, possibly carrying you off line. Since you haven't charged in on the brakes, you can get the throttle on early, before the apex, which balances and settles your bike for the drive out.

                .... More often than not, circumstances do not permit the full use of your lane from yellow line to white line and back again. Blind corners, oncoming traffic and gravel on the road are a few criteria that dictate a more conservative approach, so leave yourself a three or four foot margin for error, especially at the left side of the lane where errant oncoming traffic could prove fatal. Simply narrow your entrance on a blind right-harder and move your apex into your lane three feet on blind left turns in order to stay free of unseen oncoming traffic hogging the centerline. Because you're running at The Pace and not flat out, your controlled entrances offer additional time to deal with unexpected gravel or other debris in your lane; the outside wheel track is usually the cleanest through a dirty corner since a car weights its outside tires most, scrubbing more dirt off the pavement in the process, so aim for that line.

                A GOOD LEADER, WILLING FOLLOWERS

                .... The street is not a racing environment, and it takes humility, self assurance and self control to keep it that way. The leader sets the pace and monitors his mirrors for signs of raggedness in the ranks that follow, such as tucking in on straights, crossing over the yellow line and hanging off the motorcycle in the corners, If the leader pulls away, he simply slows his straight way speed slightly but continues to enjoy the corners, thus closing the ranks but missing none of the fun. The small group of three or four riders I ride with is so harmonious that the pace is identical no matter who's leading. The lead shifts occasionally with a quick hand sign, but there's never a pass for the lead with an ego on the sleeve. Make no mistake, the riding is spirited and quick in the corners. Anyone with a right arm can hammer down the straights; it's proficiency in the corners that makes The Pace come alive.

                .... Following distances are relatively lengthy, with the straightaways taken at more moderate speeds, providing the perfect opportunity to adjust the gaps. Keeping a good distance serves several purposes, besides being safer. Rock chips are minimized, and the police or highway patrol won't suspect a race is in progress. The Pace's style of not hanging off in corners also reduces the appearance of pushing too hard and adds a degree of maturity and sensibility in the eyes of the public and the law. There's a definite challenge to cornering quickly while sitting sedately on your bike.

                .... New rider indoctrination takes some time because The Pace develops very high cornering speeds and newcomers want to hammer the throttle on the exits to make up for what they lose at the entrances. Our group slows drastically when a new rider joins the ranks because our technique of moderate straightaway speed and no brakes can suck the unaware into a corner too fast, creating the most common single bike accident. With a new rider learning The Pace behind you, tap your brake lightly well before the turn to alert him and make sure he understands there's no pressure to stay with the group.

                .... There's plenty of ongoing communication during The Pace. A foot off the peg indicates debris in the road, and all slowing or turning intentions are signaled in advance with the left hand and arm. Turn signals are used for direction changes and passing, with a wave of the left hand to thank the cars that move right and make it easy for motorcyclists to get past. Since you don't have a death grip on the handlebar, your left hand is also free to wave to oncoming riders, a fading courtesy that we'd like to see return. If you're getting the idea The Pace is a relaxing, noncompetitive way to ride with a group, you are right.

                RELAX AND FLICK IT

                .... I'd rather spend a Sunday in the mountains riding at The Pace than a Sunday at the racetrack, it's that enjoyable. Countersteering is the name of the game; smooth, forceful steering input at the handlebar relayed to the tires' contact patches through a rigid sport bike frame. Riding at The Pace is certainly what bike manufacturers had in mind when sport bikes evolved to the street.

                .... But the machine isn't the most important aspect of running The Pace because you can do it on anything capable of getting through a corner. Attitude is The Pace's most important aspect: realizing the friend ahead of you isn't a competitor, respecting his right to lead the group occasionally and giving him credit for his riding skills. You must have the maturity to limit your straightaway speeds to allow the group to stay in touch and the sense to realize that racetrack tactics such as late braking and full throttle runs to redline will alienate the public and police and possibly introduce you to the unforgiving laws of gravity. When the group arrives at the destination after running The Pace, no one feels outgunned or is left with the feeling he must prove himself on the return run. If you've got some thing to prove, get on a racetrack.

                .... The racetrack measures your speed with a stop watch and direct competition, welcoming your aggression and gritty resolve to be the best. Performance street riding's only yardstick is the amount of enjoyment gained, not lap times, finishing position or competitors beaten. The differences are huge but not always remembered by riders who haven't discovered The Pace's cornering pureness and group involvement. Hammer on the racetrack. Pace yourself on the street.

                © Copyright MOTORCYCLIST Magazine
                November 1991 issue
                Well said, and much appreciated!

                Comment


                • #53
                  The old dog new tricks - or get your head out of your deep rutted ass is key. If your stuck on a way your not engaged for potential improvements. I’m an old dog myself and an found out on the dirt what works and doesn’t, then I went for training & I’m always open to ideas. Over the last decade everyone with a proficiency ego says you’ll never see my brake light. Well have a freakin Chardonnay while sitting on your retirement sofa. I oringinaly used to trail break into corners (light on the controls) then was told for way too long to do all breaking before the corner. Now I’m back into developing trailing as my standard flow through. Doing so I was able to comfortably run Happy Camp at a reasonable and respectful pace with the boys this past summer. If you don’t like to see my brake light don’t worry. For most, it won’t be within sight for long. For those truly messed up about it I’ll tape over it so you can focus on your ride. I always ride within my abilities & reprimand myself incessantly when I recognize I couldn’t have stopped or avoided a situation just passed. I understand the need for speed to be preferable on the track, but frankly that’s not readily accessible in my area nor within my budget. So yeah I have fun on the back roads away from homes, pedestrians, and traffic. I like lighting the way on the Duffy, between Cache Creek & Merritt and anywhere else I feel it’s a respectable fit. Nothing like a well maintained flying pig on fire.
                  sigpic

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    True dat, BC!
                    ”Brake until your are comfortable with your speed and direction.” Yamaha School of Champions. I used to do the Keith Code brake, release and turn, but trail braking is so much better on the track and street. Piken’s tips and the pros’ tip on the subject have helped my riding tremendously. I love the track but still ride hard on the street, especially on rural less traveled highways. (Sans, the Oregon 101 flyby with Gregness...) Good times on that Happy Camp ride with you and Gregness!
                    My ol' ZZR1200 pics:
                    http://zzrbikes.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=156883

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      To the "old dog new tricks" I have been riding for over 45 years now. I have learned probably as much (or more)
                      in the past 5 years, as the first 5. The bikes change, we change, and we get smarter (hopefully).
                      I come across different situations all of the time on the street, still to this day. Most of the time I ride alone.
                      I guess that's an ole fart thing too but it's mainly because of the guys I rode with either don't ride anymore
                      or I just go at a moments notice.I still see "competitive" riding on the street and just think to myself, they'll
                      learn, I hope. I love "The Pace" and another was the "Twist of the Wrist" from years back too. Never hurts
                      to improve ones riding skills but it will hurt if you don't, that's a guarantee.
                      "If it ain't broke, don't fix it"

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by spedxprt View Post
                        True dat, BC!
                        ”Brake until your are comfortable with your speed and direction.” Yamaha School of Champions. I used to do the Keith Code brake, release and turn, but trail braking is so much better on the track and street. Piken’s tips and the pros’ tip on the subject have helped my riding tremendously. I love the track but still ride hard on the street, especially on rural less traveled highways. (Sans, the Oregon 101 flyby with Gregness...) Good times on that Happy Camp ride with you and Gregness!
                        I like to trail brake into blind corners as it's much easier to get on the brakes if you need to. But the Zed definitely preferred to do it's braking in a straight line!
                        "You don't get slower with age, you just get more cautious." Michael Rutter

                        06 Ocean Blue ZZR1200, the coolest colour.
                        99 Yamaha R1

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          I've been trail-braking my Zed since I read Ienatsch - but it's probably more because I'm terrified of trying to change direction on my flying pig

                          Hopefully Champ School next year turns me into pig bike Reuben Xaus

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