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  • #46
    when tires are tighter than a 40 y/o sheep....

    Not that I can speak from any sheep experience, but I have had tires that were hard to take off. I have found this tip to work wonderfully.....

    I live in Florida, and we get a lot of sunshine. Prior to changing a tire, I take the wheel (with old tire on it) and the new tire and lay them both out in the sun for about an hour. This makes the tires really soft (deflate the one on the rim). Once they are soft they are much more pliable to work with and also seat with lower air pressure. Why? Because they have a memory from the tires sometimes get squished in transit. Putting them in the sun will make them bow out to the original shape and be in the same shape as the rim, wide enough to catch the air when seating the bead.

    If you don't live in a warm climate you can find some kind of workaround or heat source.
    2002 Kawasaki ZZR1200, 2007 DRZ400SM Suzuki, 2004 Suzuki SV65
    Responsible for wrenching on all those plus my daughters' 2007 ZZR 600
    US Review http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/ro...kes/index.html
    EU Review http://www.motorbikestoday.com/revie...es/ZZR1200.htm

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    • #47
      Re: when tires are tighter than a 40 y/o sheep....

      Originally posted by Cooter
      Prior to changing a tire, I take the wheel (with old tire on it) and the new tire and lay them both out in the sun for about an hour. This makes the tires really soft (deflate the one on the rim). Once they are soft they are much more pliable to work with and also seat with lower air pressure. Why? Because they have a memory from the tires sometimes get squished in transit. Putting them in the sun will make them bow out to the original shape and be in the same shape as the rim, wide enough to catch the air when seating the bead.
      That's a great tip that I could have used just the other day to get my new tires properly shaped. It was a bit of a hassle getting them to catch air.

      Thanks, Cooter!
      How To Cheat on Personality Tests
      1. When asked for word associations or comments about the world, give the most conventional, run-of-the-mill, pedestrian answer possible.

      2. To settle on the most beneficial answer to any question, repeat to yourself:
      (a) I loved my father and my mother, but my father a little bit more.
      (b) I like things pretty well the way they are.
      (c) I never worry much about anything.
      (d) I don't care for books or music much.
      (e) I love my wife and children.
      (f) I don't let them get in the way of company work.
      From <cite>The Organization Man</cite> by William Hollingsworth Whyte, 1956

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      • #48
        I guess I'm just getting to be a lazy old fart, but for 20 bucks a wheel, I'll let a shop with a no-mar changer handle the tire swap duty.

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        • #49
          Danno, I have the HF changer but have not used it lately due to dinging up the wheels. With the mods in the above thread it may be worthwhile to do it myself again.

          In my area, Cycle Gear charged $30 plus $3 for a valve stem and $3 tire disposal fee so it's closer to $40. Valve stems are a buck apiece at the auto parts store. If I buy their tire at retail price they install it for $20.

          The locak Kaw dealer will install for free if I buy through them at a price like retail + $10 plus tax. If I bring my own tire and rim they refuse to do it, or will do it for an hour labor, currently $95. That is a lot of schit IMHO.

          I'm still debating whether to use my HF or CG as I have a rear tire on the way from Chaparall Motorsports.
          2002 Kawasaki ZZR1200, 2007 DRZ400SM Suzuki, 2004 Suzuki SV65
          Responsible for wrenching on all those plus my daughters' 2007 ZZR 600
          US Review http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/ro...kes/index.html
          EU Review http://www.motorbikestoday.com/revie...es/ZZR1200.htm

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          • #50
            I have the HF changer and the morcycle attachment. The best part about it to me is that it not only changes bike tires as fast as the kaw shop could, I don't have to drive the 45 mile round trip to the shop! Figure that at 20 mpg and $4 per gallon, that's another $10. PLUS, I have changed the 35" tires on my mud truck with it with no problems. No BS, and there was a lot of dried mud inside the tire from popping a bead in a mud hole!
            Get the HF and do your own, I didn't put anything on the irons simply because I have the bike to ride not to sleep with and if you pay attention, yes even drunk, you can do it with minimum to no scratches.

            vlvguy

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            • #51
              Nice

              Hmmmmm....interesting.I've been considering getting the no=mar as i do believe it to be a nice set-up,but maybe if i start with the HF unit i could save enough to find me a mig welder!
              sigpic

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              • #52
                Tire Changing 101

                I have purchased a new set of tires for my ZZR 1200 and I would like to remove the wheels myself, run them to the local shop for mounting & balancing and then reinstall the wheels. Can someone please tell me generally what the procedure is for both the front & rear? Will I need to remove sprocket, disc brake rotors, etc.........More specifically I need to know the sequence for reinstalling the front wheel, which bolts to tighten first, what torque to use, etc.....Thanks in advance.

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                • #53
                  Re: Tire Changing 101

                  Originally posted by DJZZR
                  I have purchased a new set of tires for my ZZR 1200 and I would like to remove the wheels myself, run them to the local shop for mounting & balancing and then reinstall the wheels. Can someone please tell me generally what the procedure is for both the front & rear? Will I need to remove sprocket, disc brake rotors, etc.........More specifically I need to know the sequence for reinstalling the front wheel, which bolts to tighten first, what torque to use, etc.....Thanks in advance.
                  Detailed instructions are found in Section 10 of the Service Manual..

                  If you don't have one, here's a place you can get it, courtesy of RideMyOwn..

                  You'll need RAR file extractor software.. You can download a free RAR file extractor from www.downloads.com.. Search for "7-Zip".. It works great and it's free.

                  Cheers.

                  Originally posted by RideMyOwn

                  http://www.4shared.com/file/62460850...lish_.html?s=1

                  Need help send me a PM.

                  Ciao' Babes!
                  “Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.”...Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

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                  • #54
                    Re: Tire Changing 101

                    Originally posted by DJZZR
                    Can someone please tell me generally what the procedure is for both the front & rear? Will I need to remove sprocket, disc brake rotors, etc.........More specifically I need to know the sequence for reinstalling the front wheel, which bolts to tighten first, what torque to use, etc.
                    You can check here. Should have the information you need.
                    Wheel Removal "How To" Article

                    As a reminder, if anyone has any more How-To articles to submit, you can send them to me and I'll post them with the others I collected:
                    http://www.camcycle.net/HowTo/howto.html
                    Cam
                    '02 ZZR1200 || '07 KLR650 || '72 CL350
                    '98 XV1100 || '93 XJ600 || '82 XJ650
                    "Never mind the track. The track is for punks. We are Road People. We are Cafe Racers." - Hunter S. Thompson

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                    • #55
                      gotta take the risk!

                      I just ordered me a new set of Cont RA's and for my ZZR for a total of $236.I also have ordered a tire changer from Harbor Freight.The changer is actually a 2 item order.I've only recieved one part of my order from HF and was told the other section is backordered till 4/17/09! After viewing Cameron's HOW2 using same changer...i'm hopeful to change my tires myself,i need to make or find a affordable balancer soon. After my last experience with the shop where i bought and had my last set of tires installed.....i can't do much worse!
                      sigpic

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                      • #56
                        Re: Tire Changing 101

                        Originally posted by cam_1100
                        Originally posted by DJZZR
                        Can someone please tell me generally what the procedure is for both the front & rear? Will I need to remove sprocket, disc brake rotors, etc.........More specifically I need to know the sequence for reinstalling the front wheel, which bolts to tighten first, what torque to use, etc.
                        You can check here. Should have the information you need.
                        Wheel Removal "How To" Article

                        As a reminder, if anyone has any more How-To articles to submit, you can send them to me and I'll post them with the others I collected:
                        http://www.camcycle.net/HowTo/howto.html

                        Thanks for the HowTo Cam. I like the Jessica Simpson reference at the bottom.
                        It could read, I'm so easy, she could do me! Heh heh heh.

                        Actually, I have a really hard time getting the Zed onto the center stand. It's like I can't get any leverage to get over the hump.

                        I said hump, and mentioned Jessica Simpson in the same post ... but they weren't together.(?)
                        2004 ZZR1200

                        My Gallery Albums
                        My PhotoBucket Albums
                        sigpic

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                        • #57
                          Re: Tire Changing 101

                          Originally posted by bad-hd
                          Thanks for the HowTo Cam. I like the Jessica Simpson reference at the bottom.
                          It could read, I'm so easy, she could do me! Heh heh heh.
                          Thank Robert for that one...I'm just hosting the pages so people can still find them. It's just too bad that all technical manuals don't include "diagrams" like that!
                          Cam
                          '02 ZZR1200 || '07 KLR650 || '72 CL350
                          '98 XV1100 || '93 XJ600 || '82 XJ650
                          "Never mind the track. The track is for punks. We are Road People. We are Cafe Racers." - Hunter S. Thompson

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                          • #58
                            Re: Tire Changing 101

                            I was looking for the harbor Freight Cheap $150 deal that they dont sell any longer.. so I just bought 2 of their long tire irons. With this method below and a basic bead breaker you can pull this off in 5-10 minutes a wheel. I use a couple of 2x4 to keep the rotor off the ground.

                            By the time you drive to your local MC shop you would be done.



                            Remove:



                            Install:


                            the key is to move your knees up as you take "little Bites" Most gas station air sources dont have enough flow to re-seat the bead.. a basic 5 cfpm deal should work. if need be go to a tire shop to get it aired up. Make sure to keep your FACE out of the plane of the tire iron or it can hit you in the face... little common sense. Also change your valve stems. Simple $10 tool that pulls and installs them. They are about $1 maybe.

                            bead breaker. You can use a heavy chair leg and your most "robust buddy" in the chair.. or this route or "carefully drive over with a larger truck suv" these brits pulled it off and good laughs

                            http://www.jpcycles.com/product/2170...1&zmap=2170080

                            For balancing I went with Dyna Beads. Works great. Zed has never been smoother. 2oz in front and rear. DONT USE SOAP. use windex for tire lube. So the dyna beads dont stick to any residue left inside the tire. windex evaporates fast. I air out a little before I air up.. to make sure its all dry in there http://www.innovativebalancing.com/motorcycle.htm

                            Last time I got my conti Road Attack 2 from Competition Accessories on the east coast. They had conti drop ship to me in CA showed up in 2 days.

                            I love not having to rely on the shops for this.. If you are forcing something in this process watch the video again as your doing something wrong. Its easy. If you can use basic tools... and have some mechanical background this is not hard. But be careful. dont do this if you have doubts.


                            Great way to save some $$
                            Last edited by jmenon; 11-03-2011, 01:04 AM.

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