Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tire Changing 101

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Tire Changing 101

    Maybe one of the mods could make this a sticky?

    I've decided I've been reliant on dealers long enough to change my tires.

    I'm looking for all the equipment I need to be able to do my own.
    (on a budget)

    I can't really afford a $500-$600 tire changer at this point, so please
    help me with tire changing on a budget.

    Although the tire monkeys at the shop really enjoy scratching my wheels, I'd prefer a better approach. Maybe rim protectors of rubberized tire irons?

    I've done dirtbike tires using screwdrivers, e.t.c. , but not tubeless street tires.

    I don't mind busting my knuckles, but if there's a better way, I'd like to hear about it.

    Please provide links if possible. I want to be set up and ready to go by the 1st of the year and declare my independance once and for all against these rubber peddlers.

    Thanks - appreciate any and all info guys!
    <div>A father say's to his son " if you keep doing that. you'll go blind"


    The son replies "I'm over here Dad"!</div>

  • #2
    I quit levering my own on and off years ago. Tube-type bias ply tires were easy compared to tubeless radials. I wouldn't do it for the $20 it costs me to have one mounted and balanced. And my guy doesn't scratch the rims.

    Comment


    • #3
      I can relate to this!

      Sadly, I am saving up for the No-Mar system.
      I've not found anything home-brewed that I feel can top the no-mar system.

      http://www.cyclepathic.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        I looked at that no-mar, and with 3 bikes, it's just not in my budget right now...sometimes, we all have to have one of those "b...." things.

        I want to see the harbor freight cheap, but works stuff!
        <div>A father say's to his son " if you keep doing that. you'll go blind"


        The son replies "I'm over here Dad"!</div>

        Comment


        • #5
          I've heard people using this one that says it works well. It is Harbor Freight however, but for the price it may do the job.
          http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=42927

          I've thought about going this route, but decided that the time and hassle (not to mention risk of scratched wheels or *gasp* bent disks) is not worth it to me.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by clausiam
            I've heard people using this one that says it works well. It is Harbor Freight however, but for the price it may do the job.
            http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=42927

            I've thought about going this route, but decided that the time and hassle (not to mention risk of scratched wheels or *gasp* bent disks) is not worth it to me.
            I've got the harbour freight one. I have taken that rubber tool dip stuff and coated the part that clamps the rim and the bead breaker. That way it does not scratch the rims. Buy the No-Mar mount/demount bar it also won't scratch and works very well. I can change my tire in about 10 minutes or less, balancing is also very easy. I like 10 minutes better than the $40 dollars the local stealership charges to mount and balance. Besides I live in the middle of nowhere and it would take longer to drive to the dealership.

            Comment


            • #7
              o.k. thanks!

              I'm gonna try it...
              <div>A father say's to his son " if you keep doing that. you'll go blind"


              The son replies "I'm over here Dad"!</div>

              Comment


              • #8
                Coats 220 here and if you provide lodging and beer, maybe we can work some out. I'll bring the bike and changer up every quarter and well scrub those tires in after we spoon them on and the beer settles.
                sigpicHard times don't last... Hard men do...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by technut
                  I've got the harbour freight one. I have taken that rubber tool dip stuff and coated the part that clamps the rim and the bead breaker. That way it does not scratch the rims. Buy the No-Mar mount/demount bar it also won't scratch and works very well. I can change my tire in about 10 minutes or less, balancing is also very easy. I like 10 minutes better than the $40 dollars the local stealership charges to mount and balance. Besides I live in the middle of nowhere and it would take longer to drive to the dealership.
                  10 minutes?? Methinks that's a bit optimistic (getting wheel on and off will take you longer than that).

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Val
                    Coats 220 here and if you provide lodging and beer, maybe we can work some out. I'll bring the bike and changer up every quarter and well scrub those tires in after we spoon them on and the beer settles.
                    ...sounds good, it usually takes me a 6 pack or so, before I do any stoppies though.

                    <div>A father say's to his son " if you keep doing that. you'll go blind"


                    The son replies "I'm over here Dad"!</div>

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I started changing my own with the Harbor Freight stuff this year. WELL worth it. I only wish I would have started doing it sooner. I posted a write-up on another site I could copy over here if anyone is interested...
                      Cam
                      '02 ZZR1200 || '07 KLR650 || '72 CL350
                      '98 XV1100 || '93 XJ600 || '82 XJ650
                      "Never mind the track. The track is for punks. We are Road People. We are Cafe Racers." - Hunter S. Thompson

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        please do cam - I started this thread so it could be a reference to anyone wishing to do the same.

                        Besides ins., it's my biggest expense .
                        <div>A father say's to his son " if you keep doing that. you'll go blind"


                        The son replies "I'm over here Dad"!</div>

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I've started changing my own tires, saving the trip to the cycle shop and the labor costs. Using the Central Machinery tire changer and motorcycle tire attachment at $40-$50 for each, they've almost paid for themselves after only 2 sets of tires.



                          Here's all the parts you get. From the left, the tire changer includes the tire changing stand and 4ft tire iron, while the motorcycle attachment package includes the wheel clamp and leverage arm. I use the bolts to anchor it down when in use. For motorcycles, the lower stand is really only used for the bead breaker, but also includes the 4ft tire iron which works pretty well. It also gets everything up to a level that's easier to work on:



                          You need to anchor the whole thing down to use it. Some folks just bolt it to a 4x4 ft piece of plywood, but I used some concrete anchors to bolt it to the pad at the side entrance to my garage. When I'm not using it, I take it in and put some smaller bolts in the anchors to keep out dirt:



                          Make sure to keep pesky spectators away while setting up...don't want anyone to see you screw it up:




                          The bead breaker works great. Since the ground slopes away, I need a 4x4 to help keep the tire level, but it also keeps the rotor off the ground and keeps dirt out of the hub. Also, I used a piece of carpet to protect the rim from the nub that keeps the wheel from sliding off. Remove the valve core from the tire to let all the air out, set the breaker just outside the rim, then use the tire iron as a lever to push the breaker down. Do this in a few spots on both sides of the tire:




                          After breaking the bead, mount the tire on the changer. The clamps hold the rim and keep the rotors elevated. I added some small rubber pieces to help protect the rim:



                          Once the wheel is secured I put on the leverage arm:



                          One end of the tire iron is for removing, the other is for installing. I found some of those furniture sliders that fit perfectly after a slight trim and some Crazy Glue to hold it on.



                          Use some soapy water to help the tire slide over the rim:



                          **Make sure not to lever the tire iron against sprockets or brake rotors. Remove them if possible**
                          Insert the removal end of the tire iron between the tire and the wheel with the flat side against the rim. Notice how the slider protects the rim:



                          Then flip the bar over to pull the tire up over the lip of the rim:




                          Then leveraging against the center post, rotate all the way around until the tire is completely over the rim:




                          Then repeat for the bottom lip of the tire:





                          I use this to clean off the rim where the bead sits. Not exactly sure what's in it, but it smells a lot like paint thinner or mineral spirits, which I've also heard recommended for cleaning rims:



                          Then soap the rim and new tire to lubricate:




                          Make sure you have the tire oriented in the right direction, then set the new tire on the rim and re-install the leverage post. Push the lip of the tire partway over the rim, then insert the installation end of the tire iron with the hook over the rim and the tire resting on the flat portion:



                          Then rotate as far around as you can. When installing, the tire will tighten down on the iron. When you get to the point where you can no longer easily slide the iron around the rim, lever it over to the other side of the wheel. This should pop the tire the rest of the way over the rim. Repeat for the top of the tire:





                          Now the tire should be all the way on the rim. Most tires will have a colored dot to indicate the light spot on the tire. Spin the tire on the rim until this spot is lined up with the valve stem...this should save some balancing later. Then you need to seat the beads. Re-insert the valve core and start inflating the tire. Make sure not to have anything resting in the bead area because when they pop into place, they pop HARD! It's pretty scary the first time you do it... Adjust the tire to the proper pressure, put the valve cap back on, re-install the rotor or sprocket and any wheel spacers (basically anything that rotates with the wheel) and you are ready to balance.

                          I got this balancer setup from a guy on e-bay. Basically some rollerblade bearings in aluminum brackets with a steel rod and cones (the jack stands are mine). It wouldn't be too hard to make your own, but at the price I got it wouldn't have been worth the effort. Just resting on the stands at this point, so I still need to figure out something to permanently mount them to:



                          Spin the tire and note where it stops. Then repeat. If it stops in the same place, the heavy spot will be at the bottom. Tape some weights on the opposite side of the wheel from the heavy spot and repeat. Adjust the weight until the tire stops in random spots. Then manually rotate the tire to a few spots and let go. If it stays put, it's balanced. Remove the tape and permanently adhere the weights to the wheel (if using stick-ons).

                          This was my second attempt and went better than the first. It's really not difficult. It's harder to explain than it is to do. The tire change shop is open to any ZZRBikes.com member that wants to stop by.

                          This page was very helpful in guiding me through my first couple attempts. The MoJo lever he recommends looks like it would work well and protect your rims even better than my cloodged-up sliders.
                          Cam
                          '02 ZZR1200 || '07 KLR650 || '72 CL350
                          '98 XV1100 || '93 XJ600 || '82 XJ650
                          "Never mind the track. The track is for punks. We are Road People. We are Cafe Racers." - Hunter S. Thompson

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Ga_BMW_Rider
                            Originally posted by Val
                            Coats 220 here and if you provide lodging and beer, maybe we can work some out. I'll bring the bike and changer up every quarter and well scrub those tires in after we spoon them on and the beer settles.
                            ...sounds good, it usually takes me a 6 pack or so, before I do any stoppies though.

                            Well that shouldn't be an issue unless we run into an old cold tire.
                            A tire changer really starts to pay off quick with traxk days....
                            sigpicHard times don't last... Hard men do...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by clausiam
                              Originally posted by technut
                              I've got the harbour freight one. I have taken that rubber tool dip stuff and coated the part that clamps the rim and the bead breaker. That way it does not scratch the rims. Buy the No-Mar mount/demount bar it also won't scratch and works very well. I can change my tire in about 10 minutes or less, balancing is also very easy. I like 10 minutes better than the $40 dollars the local stealership charges to mount and balance. Besides I live in the middle of nowhere and it would take longer to drive to the dealership.
                              10 minutes?? Methinks that's a bit optimistic (getting wheel on and off will take you longer than that).
                              true, I was talking about just the labor to change the tire not remove it from the bike. The NO-Mar website has a video of a guy changing a tire in I think it is 21 seconds. My set-up is very similar to theirs. Check out the video, it is mostly technique.
                              http://www.nomartirechanger.com/

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X