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  • Rear spring removal?

    Hi guys, I was wondering if anyone knows how to remove the adjuster and rear spring off an '02 rear shock? I'm thinking of replacing the rear shock on my ZX11 with the ZZR1200 unit but would like to see about rebuilding it or at least changing the oil and / or seals.

    Regards,
    M.Rad.


  • #2
    You can't really rebuild them. Not that I've heard of. Every blue moon aftermarket ones come up for sale around here.
    KN, this ride's for You.

    http://i415.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps2ecwj35m.jpg

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks jimmymac, but I'm the kind who likes a challenge (within reason). There's gotta be some way to get into the guts of the thing. I'll keep poking around...

      Comment


      • #4
        https://zzrbikes.com/forum/bikes/zzr...-now-with-pics

        (Pics are no longer shown - old post).

        Cost these days is around $900 AUS.

        I actually bought a "younger" OEM shock on eBay, for around $130 AUS.
        My original one had about 130,000km on it, the newer one only about 40,000km.
        Last edited by BillDownUnder; 12-20-2018, 07:16 PM.
        I suffer from kleptomania. When it gets bad, I take something for it.

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        • #5
          BillDownUnder, while I would love to have something like that Icon, there's no way I can spend ~$750 U.S. on a shock for a bike that cost me $3000 including the replacement engine (after I sell some of the parts bike bits, I hope to get back to the ~ $2200 I paid for it in initially).
          I have to work with either what I have now or other used parts, along with a healthy dose of ingenuity and D.I.Y. That's why I'm asking about how to disassemble the ZZR1200 unit.

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          • #6
            I posted it for interest's sake.
            The cost is also why I went for a "younger" OEM shock.
            I suffer from kleptomania. When it gets bad, I take something for it.

            Comment


            • #7
              I looked as well. Some of those aftermarket rear shocks should come with stock options.$$$
              I have kicked the settings up on mine to help with a little softness. Mine is just old
              but doesn't have a lot of miles like most 02's out there. I do have a set of new 05
              forks on the front now, that was a big improvement over the 02's that had no rebound
              adjustment, just compression. I'm always riding alone so the rear spring is still ok.
              "If it ain't broke, don't fix it...
              but sometimes it just needs a mod"

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              • #8
                Yeah, maybe a retirement plan too, eh Charlie!
                Right now I have the 02 forks that I serviced on mine and I like them, although I'm already thinking about upgrading to 04 and up. They are comfortable and handle well, except for the heavy dive under braking. I have 7.5wt oil and the preload up nearly all the way and they still dive significantly. I guess I need stiffer springs?
                The rear shock I took apart cleaned, and added 15wt oil, which may be a bit thick. I have it on lowest rebound setting and it's pretty firm but rideable. On setting #4 it's a jackhammer.
                I don't have time to experiment right now with the holidays and all, I'm just weighing options, getting opinions and doing research for later.

                I'll tell you one thing though, I've become spoiled by the long travel suspension on my CR500. It's totally plush on the small stuff but still soaks up 10" jumps. But I guess there's only so much you can do with 4" of travel on a street machine.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I suspect they improved the valving in the later model forks. I found 7.5 wt to be too heavy in my 05.

                  I was never entirely happy with the forks, but there is little that can be done apart from oil and springs.

                  I fitted a 0 mile rear shock, which was a significant improvement. But I doubt there are any left out there. You can get new YSS or Hagon shocks for $500-600 without the remote preload adjuster.

                  How did you disassemble the shock and repressurise it?


                  Last edited by Moise; 12-24-2018, 08:24 AM.
                  "You don't get slower with age, you just get more cautious." Michael Rutter

                  06 Ocean Blue ZZR1200, the coolest colour.
                  99 Yamaha R1

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                  • #10
                    ZX Rear shock.jpg Hi Moise- The shock I rebuilt was from the ZX11. Those come apart pretty easy. I had to grind the "stake" holding the nut on to the shaft off, but everything else is very straighforward.

                    (Release spring pressure, pull spring down slightly by hand, slip out spring retainer, use punch to drive retainer up and out of body, remove circlip holding seal retainer, pull out guts, grind shallow angle bevel to remove "stake" holding nut to shaft, disassemble components, clean, reassemble, stake nut to shaft, add same amount of oil as removed, reinstall retainer, circlip spring, spring retainer, -DONE)

                    As for pressurizing it, I used CDA shop air at 150psi . I don't believe that Nitrogen is necessary, after all almost all forks use ambient air without a problem. Actually I'm not sure that pressurizing is even needed at all, but that's another debate...

                    The ZZR1200 shock seems to be a sealed (as in, welded) assembly although I won't know for sure until I get the spring off.
                    There is a guy on the COG that says he removed the spring and adjuster on one of these, but his description is not clear and the post was from years ago. In fact he says he was able to take the remote adjuster and transfer it to a ZX9 shock and make it work. That would be sweet because those shocks are dead cheap and rebuildable!
                    Last edited by M.Rad.; 12-28-2018, 04:03 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by M.Rad. View Post
                      ZX Rear shock.jpg Hi Moise- The shock I rebuilt was from the ZX11. Those come apart pretty easy. I had to grind the "stake" holding the nut on to the shaft off, but everything else is very straighforward.

                      (Release spring pressure, pull spring down slightly by hand, slip out spring retainer, remove circlip holding seal retainer, use punch to drive retainer up and out of body, pull out guts, grind shallow angle bevel to remove "stake" holding nut to shaft, disassemble components, clean, reassemble, stake nut to shaft, add same amount of oil as removed, reinstall retainer, circlip spring, spring retainer, -DONE)

                      As for pressurizing it, I used CDA shop air at 150psi . I don't believe that Nitrogen is necessary, after all almost all forks use ambient air without a problem. Actually I'm not sure that pressurizing is even needed at all, but that's another debate...

                      The ZZR1200 shock seems to be a sealed (as in, welded) assembly although I won't know for sure until I get the spring off.
                      There is a guy on the COG that says he removed the spring and adjuster on one of these, but his description is not clear and the post was from years ago. In fact he says he was able to take the remote adjuster and transfer it to a ZX9 shock and make it work. That would be sweet because those shocks are dead cheap and rebuildable!
                      Thanks, I somehow missed the part where you said it was the ZX11 shock.

                      I have read a few posts where people have fitted ZX9R shocks to a ZZR1200 with good results. Would be great if you can fit the remote preload adjuster.

                      Last edited by Moise; 12-24-2018, 01:09 PM.
                      "You don't get slower with age, you just get more cautious." Michael Rutter

                      06 Ocean Blue ZZR1200, the coolest colour.
                      99 Yamaha R1

                      Comment

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