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ZZR 600 year 2001

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  • ZZR 600 year 2001

    Hi - new to forum. Have owned my ZZR 600 for about 12 years, and for the last 4 have had it SORN gathering dust etc. But a spring project to get it back on the road. I know there is work to do on the carbs, but also I am keen to replace a range of bolts that have now rusted on their heads that make the bike look a little unloved and tired. But I have no idea how I would ID the size and thread of bolts to find replacements? Is there a stockist or outlet that sells this sort of product, that would be able to provide a 'pack' for a 2001 ZZR6? Or will i just need to take them out and clean them up individually? Many thanks.

  • #2
    Try ronayers.com

    They might have a parts diagram for that model.

    Otherwise, looks like you might have to resort to a Kawasaki dealer. You'd think they'd have access to the parts you're looking for.

    Welcome to the site
    I have neither the time,or the inclination, to explain myself to a man, who rises and sleep under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner, in which I provide it. I'd rather you just say 'thank you' and go on your way.

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    • #3
      Bike bandit is good as well, not sure about specific bolts though
      https://www.bikebandit.com

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      • #4
        To ID bolts is actually not very difficult. This isn't meant to sound condescending, so forgive me if it does. Everything on our Kawi's is metric (provided it is original and not bastardized). You'll have M4, M5, M6, M8 and M10, maybe M12 bolts. Thread pitch is relatively straight forward with the diameter. Meaning, there aren't many different thread pitches for one diameter, course and fine threads really. Are there customs, yes, yet in most instances, not for this application. To find out what you have, you could do it a number of different ways. First, if you use the parts locator on say Ron Ayers, Revzilla, Bike Bandit, or even Kawasaki, you'll see listing as "M6 1.25x55". This is telling you it is an M6 diameter, thread pitch is specified as 1.25 and length is 55mm. Another way is to buy a thread gauge. Pro-Bolt, Home Depot, Lowe's, Ace, etc, has these available for purchase and it will help you later on for all kinds of projects or random bolt, for metric or SAE. Finally, if all else and you need to know quick and don't have time for search, head to Home Depot, Lowe's, Fastenal, Ace, wherever sells hardware, there will be bungs and studs on a board to check the diameter and pitch, then match the length while you're there.

        Now some caveats. M3 and some M4 will be sooo close to SAE threads such as 10-32, 8-40, and similar tiny screws, it will be difficult to tell. Meaning the metric and standard will thread into the opposing metric or standard nut. Especially if you have an old screw/bolt that has been abused. Make sure it threads ALL THE WAY THRU without catching, by hand. Don't get hung up on hardware, it may seem like too much but it really isn't.

        To answer your question in another way. If you can remove the bolt, it can be cleaned up and reused. A buffing wheel and a little compound. Try Kroil or motor oil to loosen the gunk and rust, then give it good mild wire wheel or scotch bright pad to clean it up. Paint the head if you need it to look amazing. If you must buy new hardware, Pro-bolt is expensive but pretty. Simple kits from Amazon can go a long ways too. Another option and just as expensive as Pro-bolt is OEM. Ace, Home Depot, Lowe's, hardware stores of any kind, might get you fixed up quicker than waiting on OEM or Pro-bolt too. I've used all of the above. Just depends what I need. Match diameter, length, pitch and materials to original or what the mating material is, and you've got it. You can go down the rabbit hole, but no need to on this, really.

        Sorry for the long wind, hope you get something out of it.

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        • #5


          I have neither the time,or the inclination, to explain myself to a man, who rises and sleep under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner, in which I provide it. I'd rather you just say 'thank you' and go on your way.

          Comment

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