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  • Steering instability

    So, recently I was afforded the opportunity to ride a new zx6r and it felt really firm and confident when turning. By turning, I'm speaking of getting the bike low and pushing it pretty hard. It felt similar to my zzr600 when just cruising, just way more uncomfortable, but in the turns it didn't feel like it flexed near at all and was very planted compared to my bike.

    I've been pondering some ways to get my bike to feel a bit more firm and not as loose in the turns and I've come down to thinking that if I got a front fork brace, adjusted my sag, possibly got better springs set to my weight (180 gearless), and a stiffer rear spring that it may cause it to feel a bit more stable in turns. Should I start mapping my suspension out and see if that aids the issue, or go this route and then the suspension mapping? I'm not turning this bike into a track bike, but I would like to feel a bit more confident in my bike though turns than I am now. Right now it feels really light in the front and a bit loose, not to bad though, in the back. My fork seals are okay, but I don't no when the fork oil was last replaced.

    Whats your opinions or ideas?



    (Edited by R66 to correct spelling in title.)
    Last edited by ramblin66; 08-05-2016, 07:31 AM.


    "Life's more fun with a knee on the ground."

  • #2
    Re: Steering instabilit

    Tires?

    What are you running now?

    I'm not a 600 guy, but on the 1200 I found that tires (brands, models) can make a big difference.
    “Live a good life. If there are gods and they are just, then they will not care how devout you have been, but will welcome you based on the virtues you have lived by. If there are gods, but unjust, then you should not want to worship them. If there are no gods, then you will be gone, but will have lived a noble life that will live on in the memories of your loved ones.”...Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

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    • #3
      Re: Steering instability

      Sort out your current suspension first. This way you have a reference point to see if anything you do is an improvement or not.
      Then tires if you have the time and money.
      Other upgrades. Fork oil viscosity, springs, etc.
      Fork brace made a big difference on the 1200.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Re: Steering instability

        For tires I'm running Bridgestone Battlaxe BT016 Pros. Theyre pretty new with enough tread and even wearing on them so far.

        Since the fork oil hasn't been changed since my ownership (about 4,000 miles) I'm going to change that with whats recommended by the manufacturer soon.


        "Life's more fun with a knee on the ground."

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        • #5
          Re: Steering instability

          Good luck sorting out your current suspension. Also, don't know exactly what is available for the ZZR 600 when it comes to forks, shocks, etc....

          I'd definitely get both front and rear springs suited for your weight (with gear on). I fork brace couldn't hurt.

          You have to remember that the ZZR 600 wasn't designed to be a Super Sport like the ZX 6, ZX 10, etc....

          There comes a time when regardless of what you do to the bike the platform will only allow you to do so much.

          Then it comes time to bight the bullet and get a pure Super Sport platform.

          JMHO


          Good luck.
          I have neither the time,or the inclination, to explain myself to a man, who rises and sleep under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner, in which I provide it. I'd rather you just say 'thank you' and go on your way.

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          • #6
            Re: Steering instability

            Originally posted by BIG O View Post
            Good luck sorting out your current suspension. Also, don't know exactly what is available for the ZZR 600 when it comes to forks, shocks, etc....

            I'd definitely get both front and rear springs suited for your weight (with gear on). I fork brace couldn't hurt.

            You have to remember that the ZZR 600 wasn't designed to be a Super Sport like the ZX 6, ZX 10, etc....

            There comes a time when regardless of what you do to the bike the platform will only allow you to do so much.

            Then it comes time to bight the bullet and get a pure Super Sport platform.

            JMHO


            Good luck.
            I agree that eventually the bike will only be 'so fast' but it is a 2002 zx6r just rebadged and sold as a different model to fill a gap in the lineup that year.

            My goal for this bike is for it to feel just a bit firmer and planted. I don't like the sensation of sliding in the rear, or lifting in the front when I'm in turn; its like the forks are bending upwards when I'm going through a turn instead of compressing normally.


            "Life's more fun with a knee on the ground."

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            • #7
              Re: Steering instability

              Originally posted by DeEnda View Post
              Originally posted by BIG O View Post
              Good luck sorting out your current suspension. Also, don't know exactly what is available for the ZZR 600 when it comes to forks, shocks, etc....

              I'd definitely get both front and rear springs suited for your weight (with gear on). I fork brace couldn't hurt.

              You have to remember that the ZZR 600 wasn't designed to be a Super Sport like the ZX 6, ZX 10, etc....

              There comes a time when regardless of what you do to the bike the platform will only allow you to do so much.

              Then it comes time to bight the bullet and get a pure Super Sport platform.

              JMHO


              Good luck.
              I agree that eventually the bike will only be 'so fast' but it is a 2002 zx6r just rebadged and sold as a different model to fill a gap in the lineup that year.

              My goal for this bike is for it to feel just a bit firmer and planted. I don't like the sensation of sliding in the rear, or lifting in the front when I'm in turn; its like the forks are bending upwards when I'm going through a turn instead of compressing normally.
              In that case get it resprung for your weight. Possibly go to a heavier fork oil, and look into a fork brace.

              I know dick about the adjustability of the suspension on a ZZR so I don't know if the forks have the ability to be resprung or revalved.

              good luck.
              I have neither the time,or the inclination, to explain myself to a man, who rises and sleep under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner, in which I provide it. I'd rather you just say 'thank you' and go on your way.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Steering instability

                Set the sag first. It sounds like you might have too much at the rear or not enough st the front. There are no end of how to guides - check out the one at Sportrider.

                Kawi sports bikes are known for great front ends and usually have good feel and sharp turn in. Also, most current Jap bikes have Shows BPF (big piston) forks, which are in the top tier of fork performance available today.

                Sent from somewhere using Tapatalk
                Last edited by Moise; 08-05-2016, 11:44 AM.
                "You don't get slower with age, you just get more cautious." Michael Rutter

                06 Ocean Blue ZZR1200, the coolest colour.
                99 Yamaha R1

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                • #9
                  Re: Steering instability

                  Originally posted by Moise View Post
                  Set the sag first. It sounds like you might have too much at the rear or not enough st the front. There are no end of how to guides - check out the one at Sportrider.

                  Kawi sports bikes are known for great front ends and usually have good feel and sharp turn in. Also, most current Jap bikes have Shows BPF (big piston) forks, which are in the top tier of fork performance available today.

                  Sent from somewhere using Tapatalk
                  He is on a 2002 ZZr 600.

                  No Big Piston fork.

                  At 180 (sans gear) I'm pretty sure he's too heavy for the current springs.

                  Also have to take into account how many miles are on the current set up.

                  Setting the sag would be a good first step but I still beleieve he isn't going to have enough adjustment in the springs.


                  Lets face it. Sport Bikes are apparently not engineered to be ridden by people over 150 pounds


                  JMHO.
                  I have neither the time,or the inclination, to explain myself to a man, who rises and sleep under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner, in which I provide it. I'd rather you just say 'thank you' and go on your way.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Steering instability

                    Usually, the weaknesses of older sports bikes are brakes and front suspension.

                    I sat on last year's ZX 14r in a bike showroom recently, and even just giving the front forks the bounce test felt really nice!

                    Middle of winter here and they really want to sell it. If it ever stops raining, I might take it for a ride.

                    Sent from somewhere using Tapatalk
                    "You don't get slower with age, you just get more cautious." Michael Rutter

                    06 Ocean Blue ZZR1200, the coolest colour.
                    99 Yamaha R1

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                    • #11
                      Re: Steering instability

                      Its a 2007 zzr600 (2002 zx6r) with adjustable front suspension and rear. I have to look into how to adjust everything without fucking it all up

                      I can alter the compression, rebound, and preload on the suspension. So aside from getting my sag adjusted, if thats not all thats needed to make it feel right, I should lower the compression in the rear or increase it in the front you think? Sorry if I seem to be getting ahead of myself here, habit of nature


                      "Life's more fun with a knee on the ground."

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                      • #12
                        Re: Steering instability

                        As already stated, the proper springs for your weight is the place to start. But if you want to get the most out what you have now I think a professional suspension tuner is the way to go. There is a local suspension shop that will do a basic suspension set-up for around $100. That is a lot less in time and money spent trying to guess at parts that you hope will make a positive difference for you.

                        There are some excellent videos on YouTube regarding suspension set-up. It is well worth your time to watch a couple of them to see if this something you want to tackle yourself.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Steering instability

                          Here's the numbers from Sport Bike magazine's data.
                          Usually a pretty good starting point.

                          motorcycle - ZZR600 ('06)

                          front preload - 6 lines showing

                          front rebound damping - 1.5 turns out

                          front comp. damping - 2 turns out

                          rear preload - 9mm thread showing

                          rear rebound damping - full stiff

                          rear comp. damping - 1.5 turns out

                          note - Ride height: fork tubes flush with triple clamp

                          After starting there do sag.

                          After sag compress bike down from center and you
                          want bike to compress and rebound even.

                          If you find you can not set sag properly then you probably need to change springs.

                          You should change fork oil. I change fork oil annually.

                          You can also try different viscosity of oil to change damping and
                          different fill rates to effect bottom of stroke.

                          Check for stem tightness.

                          Make sure wheels are balanced and fresh rubber.

                          Tweak your tire pressures for type of riding.

                          Check front to rear wheel alignment.

                          Post some photos/vids of your corning or have someone watch just
                          to check style and technique.

                          All the above is pretty much free and once done I find it hard to
                          believe you won't be scraping hard parts.
                          Last edited by piken; 08-05-2016, 10:40 PM.
                          Our ability to distribute interesting information is out pacing our ability to create it.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Steering instability

                            Getting your suspension sorted is the biggest pain in the ass

                            However, when you do get it dialed in it is worth it.

                            Personally, I would do what mehush suggests and try and find a suspension tuner in your area. It might cost you $100 but that's cheap advice compared to dropping coin for suspension work that may not do you any good.

                            JMHO
                            I have neither the time,or the inclination, to explain myself to a man, who rises and sleep under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner, in which I provide it. I'd rather you just say 'thank you' and go on your way.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Steering instability

                              Best advice you can get - by "mehush", "piken" and "Big O" in the 3 posts above.
                              Last edited by NotDeadYet; 08-06-2016, 03:10 AM.


                              "I tried being reasonable, I didn't like it!"

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