Upcoming Events for the Next 90 Day(s)

    —» Want more? Road Trips & Planning

NOTICE Notice: This is an old thread. The last post was 3022 days ago. If your post is not directly related to this discussion please consider making a new thread.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: ZZ-R Wheel Removal for Tire change...

  1. #1
    Senior Member Disciple
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Alabamistan, USA
    Posts
    597
    With 9400 miles on my front tire and about 4000 on my second rear...both were due for a changin´.

    Holy crap! What a job getting the front wheel off was!!!

    It isn´t just that !@#$%^& Kawasaki didn´t include a decent tool to loosen the front axle with...the gorilla they used to tighten it at the factory REALLY put some torque on it to boot!!!

    By Kawasaki´s Service/Shop Manual, the procedure for front wheel removal is to remove the front fender...not necessary IF you can get the front of the bike high enough off of the ground (I removed it this time, won´t the next, will just use jack stands under the fork legs to pivot it up afte rthe rear tire is off). Then, after pulling the brake calipers, you are to loosen the RIGHT clamp bolts at the bottom of the fork tube and loosen the axle.

    Well, considering that the right side of the axle requires a 22mm allen-wrench to turn it...which !@#$%^& Kawasaki didn´t seem to include in the on-board tool kit...that would have been a hell of a trick! Checking the LEFT side of the axle showed that ´all´ it needed was a 17mm allen-wrench to turn.

    There is a tool in the tool-kit that will fit the axle-nut (left side) but there was no way I could have put enough torque on it to budge anything...but I tried with no luck.

    I had already soaked the axle-nut with penetrating oil and ran out to Sears looking for a 17- or 22mm allen wrench without luck. What I finally found that would work was a metric bolt with a 22mm head. I stuck the head in the axle, clamped my largest vice-grips to the threaded shank and pulled...and pulled...and pulled.

    What finally got it loose was pointing the vice-grips straight to the rear, 230 lbs. of me standing on the vice-grips...and bounching!!! Like I said...Holy Crap!!!

    I also tried a 17mm-headed bolt in the left side of the axle...and managed to break the shank off of the Grade 8 bolt I was using...Yes Matilda, it was that tight!!!

    When both sides of the clamp bolts were loose, the axle would turn within the fork legs slightly so I knew the axle had been torqued rather well. Also, when it finaly broke loose, I was able to remove it just using the bolt as a ´wrench´ so I don´t think that the slight corrosion I found was the problem.

    Once the axle was out...and the swearing finished...the front wheel popped right out. The rear was typical for a chain-drive bike...

    Remove the brake caliper, out with the cotter pin, off with the nut, poke the axle out to the left, drop the wheel, roll it forward to get the chain off, then roll it right out the back...easy!

    Fortunately, I didn´t need 4 hands ot put it all back together again and I ´never-siezed´ the front axle nut so I don´t think I will have too much touble next time.

    Have fun if you give it a try...
    Mike
    Exploit Fate because sometimes that's all ya' got going for you...

  2. #2
    Senior Member Journeyman
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Thunder Bay. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    345
    You may have had such difficulty removing the front axle if you didn´t loosen the two pinch bolts on each fork leg. I´m not sure because I have´nt gone out to the bike to look but I suspect that is the case.
    Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Sensei
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    3,112
    I must be a wuss... I leave the tire changin´ to the dealer.

    Did you mount the new tire yourself too? Just curious, if memory serves, the local dealer charges about 1 hour labor to do the tire install. Sometimes they´ll run a special so that if you buy the tires on site they only charge for 1/2 labor.

    I always worry that when doing "high impact" work like you describe I´ll break something (on the bike). I´ve had some bad experiences before that cost me $$ to have fixed, taught me to leave some of the stuff for the dealer to do - cheaper in the long run if I happen to break something or lack the correct tool.

    BTW: What brand tires did you choose?

    [ This message was edited by: scott on 12-09-2002 19:30 ]

  4. #4
    We appreciate the warning, I would of assumed the tool kit had the right wrench for this type of maintenance. I have ever metric socket made, but not big allen wrenches. if I can´t find one I may have to try your bolt approch and used double nuts on the shank. Then I could use my impact gun with over 500 ft-lbs of reverse torque to break it loose.

    The factory manual has this for the fron tire removal:

    "Loosen right side axel clamp bolts [A]
    axle [B]"

    It does not indicate a special tool is required. Torque on the axel is 94 ftlbs and 15 ftlbs on the clamp bolts.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Disciple
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Alabamistan, USA
    Posts
    597
    <TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD><font size=-1>Quote:</font><HR></TD></TR><TR><TD><FONT SIZE=-1><BLOCKQUOTE>
    On 2002-09-12 18:42, basket wrote:
    You may have had such difficulty removing the front axle if you didn´t loosen the two pinch bolts on each fork leg. I´m not sure because I have´nt gone out to the bike to look but I suspect that is the case.
    </BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE>

    I only loosened all 4 to see if the axle was binding or not...it wasn´t. To remove the axle I left one side (ultimately the left side) tight and applied torque to the other (right) side.

    And Yes, I knew there were two pinch-bolts per side.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Disciple
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Alabamistan, USA
    Posts
    597
    <TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD><font size=-1>Quote:</font><HR></TD></TR><TR><TD><FONT SIZE=-1><BLOCKQUOTE>
    On 2002-09-12 19:28, scott wrote:
    I must be a wuss... I leave the tire changin´ to the dealer.

    Did you mount the new tire yourself too? Just curious, if memory serves, the local dealer charges about 1 hour labor to do the tire install. Sometimes they´ll run a special so that if you buy the tires on site they only charge for 1/2 labor.

    I always worry that when doing "high impact" work like you describe I´ll break something (on the bike). I´ve had some bad experiences before that cost me $$ to have fixed, taught me to leave some of the stuff for the dealer to do - cheaper in the long run if I happen to break something or lack the correct tool.

    BTW: What brand tires did you choose?

    [ This message was edited by: scott on 12-09-2002 19:30 ]
    </BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE>

    I actually prefer to do my own maintenance...I am a ´tinkerer´ anyway, and taking things apart to see how they work is a childhood holdover. I don´t physically dismount/mount the tires, but I do balance them myself.

    One thing you might want to consider, when You do have your tires changed is to have them check the balance of the wheels without tires/balance-weights on them (you only have to do this once if you mark the wheel at the ´heavy´ spot). I had to use a heck of a lot of weight on the last rear tire to get it balanced last time. This time I checked the wheels without tires on them. I discovered that the conventional wisdom of the wheel´s ´light´ spot being where the valve-stem is doen´t always hold true. My rear wheel´s ´light´ spot is about 90 degrees from the valve-stem. I marked the wheel there, had the tire guy line up the tire´s ´heavy´ spot with that mark and only used about half the balance weight I needed last time.

    Cost to mount tires at the shop I use is $40 per tire if on the bike, $16 if You just bring the wheels in. Not THAT much difference in cost, but my work schedule, and distance from my home to the shop really didn´t permit me bringing the bike in but hauling the wheels wasn´t a problem.

    I went back to a Bridgestone Battlax BT020 on the rear, I tried a BT012 last time but didn´t see that much difference in grip for the street and got about 1000 miles less life out of it.

    On front I went with a Battlax BT010, which seems to be a trend in this area. The logic being that the softer 010 in front will be about 3/4´s gone by the time the harder rear is on a sport bike so it is more palatable to change both at the same time. Made sense to me and I have seen a LOT of sportbikes in this area running that configuration without too much problem.

    Mike

  7. #7
    Senior Member Disciple
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Alabamistan, USA
    Posts
    597
    <TABLE BORDER=0 ALIGN=CENTER WIDTH=85%><TR><TD><font size=-1>Quote:</font><HR></TD></TR><TR><TD><FONT SIZE=-1><BLOCKQUOTE>
    On 2002-09-12 20:42, Westcoast wrote:
    We appreciate the warning, I would of assumed the tool kit had the right wrench for this type of maintenance. I have ever metric socket made, but not big allen wrenches. if I can´t find one I may have to try your bolt approch and used double nuts on the shank. Then I could use my impact gun with over 500 ft-lbs of reverse torque to break it loose.

    The factory manual has this for the fron tire removal:

    "Loosen right side axel clamp bolts [A]
    axle [B]"

    It does not indicate a special tool is required. Torque on the axel is 94 ftlbs and 15 ftlbs on the clamp bolts.
    </BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></TD></TR><TR><TD><HR></TD></TR></TABLE>

    Yeah, piece of cake in the manual...just two little bolts and unscrew the axle...Uh huh!

    I found a 1/2"-drive, 17mm hex socket at the Snap-on web store. One is now on the way for the next time I will need it.

    Mike

  8. #8
    Hi folks,

    Well Sears does carry a 17mm allen wrenchs, as do most tools stores, but no one carried a 22mm. After some thought I decided to buy a extra long 7/8" standard allen wrench which was readly available (made by allen of CT out of USA Chrome alloy steel). As it tourns out 7/8" is just a few thousands larger than 22mm. It fit my 22mm impact socket perfectly. However, the tolerances on the axel bolt are slighty tigher.

    The minor clearance problem was sloved by a few wipes with a machist file and every thing fit fine. I cut a 2" peice off the end of the allen wrench so I have a custom 22mm hex bit that I can use in my impact gun with a socket. I can also use the same socket to retorque to factory specs with my torque wrench on assembly.

    I actually made two 22mm hex bits since I am a perfectionist. I polished and painted the filed area of each hex bit. The first one doesn´t look bad, but it has a little more clearance. Both are quite functional, and since I only need one for the front. I will part with the first one at no cost, except shipping. Just send me an email to work out the delivery instructions. I´ll send you the hex bit without the matching 22mm socket.

    [ This message was edited by: Westcoast on 14-09-2002 14:18 ]

  9. #9
    As a follow up I also made a socket based hex bit for the 17mm allen wrench as well, so I should be good to go when I change my tires next month. Both the 22 and 17mm size allen wrenchs were purchased with long handles so that I could remove a 2" section for the hex bit and have a normal useable handle on the remaining wrench.

    So, basically it like getting two wrenches for the price of one. The big advantage of creating the hex bit socket peice, is the ability to torque the axels down properly. If their too tight it damages the bearings, too loose and the forks may not be as stable under load. I am going to install a set of Metzeler Sport tec M1´s front and back at about 5,000 miles.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Disciple
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Alabamistan, USA
    Posts
    597
    Hey Westcoast...

    Thanks for the heads-up on the 7/8" hex-wrench. I expected there would be an inch-based near equivalent to the 22mm, just hadn´t done the checking yet.

    Later,
    Mike

Similar Threads

  1. FRONT WHEEL REMOVAL HELP PLS
    By CARECA in forum ZZR1100 Tech Forum
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 01-13-2009, 03:47 PM
  2. Wheel and Tire Removal?
    By BIG O in forum ZZR1200 Tech Forum
    Replies: 59
    Last Post: 01-20-2007, 02:55 AM
  3. Front wheel removal
    By Batt5 in forum ZZR1200 Tech Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-15-2004, 07:07 PM
  4. wheel removal
    By speedyg in forum ZZR1200 Tech Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-14-2004, 10:30 AM
  5. Front Wheel Removal?
    By SilverBullet in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-01-2003, 10:52 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •